The Scottish Crannog Centre

http://www.crannog.co.uk/
1742015 Opening times:
The Centre is open daily from 1st April to 30th October from 10am to 5:30pm; 31st Oct from 10am – 4pm.
In all cases, last full tours are one hour before closing.
Admissions 2015: Adults £8.75; Seniors £8.00; Children £6.50; Families (2+1) from £23.

General Info: The average visiting time is about one and one-half hours. Please allow longer if you are in a group. Car/coach parking is available adjacent to the Centre.
Ours is an outdoor Centre, featuring an ancient timber house. In the interests of comfort and safety, we ask that you wear or bring flat shoes.
Access: Ramps provide disabled access with assistance at the visitor centre but not out to the Crannog. Please contact us to discuss any special needs.

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The Scottish Crannog Centre
Kenmore, Loch Tay, Aberfeldy,
Perthshire, PH15 2HY, Scotland.
Tel : 01887 830583
Email : info@crannog.co.uk

Reconstructing a Crannog

How did the ancient people build their crannogs in the water? Our team of underwater archaeologists carried out a unique experiment to find out and re-discovered the secrets of ancient technology.
A crannog is a type of ancient loch-dwelling found throughout Scotland and Ireland dating from 2,500 years ago. An important part of our heritage, many crannogs were built out in the water as defensive homesteads and represented symbols of power and wealth.

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The Scottish Crannog Centre features a unique reconstruction of an early Iron Age loch-dwelling, built by the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology (STUA), registered charity no. SCO18418. This authentic recreation is based on the excavation evidence from the 2,500 year old site of ‘Oakbank Crannog’, one of the 18 crannogs preserved in Loch Tay, Scotland. The STUA continues to explore other underwater sites in Loch Tay and further afield, regularly adding new discoveries to its award-winning centre at Kenmore, Perthshire.
Crannogs are a type of ancient loch-dwelling found throughout Scotland and Ireland, while one has been discovered in Wales in Llangorse Lake. Most are circular structures that seem to have been built as individual homes to accommodate extended families. Other types of loch settlements are also found in Scandinavian countries and throughout Europe.
Crannogs are also known as artificial or modified natural islands and they were as much a product of their environment as the period in which they were constructed.
The authentic crannog reconstruction which forms the focal part of the Scottish Crannog Centre was built by the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology or STUA. The Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology is a registered charity (number SCO18418) and was formed to promote the research, recording, and preservation of Scotland’s underwater heritage.
The earliest loch-dwelling in Scotland is some 5,000 years old but people built, modified, and re-used crannogs in Scotland up until the 17th century AD. Throughout their long history crannogs served as farmers’ homesteads, status symbols, refuges in times of trouble, hunting and fishing stations, and even holiday residences. Here in Highland Perthshire, the prehistoric crannogs were originally timber-built roundhouses supported on piles or stilts driven into the lochbed.
In more barren environments and in later periods tons of rock were piled onto the lochbed to make an island on which to build a stone house. Today the crannogs appear as tree-covered islands or remain hidden as submerged stony mounds. Several hundred have been discovered so far in Scotland although only a few have been investigated. For a guide book providing more information about Scottish crannogs, contact us at info@crannog.co.uk.

You can look at some of the underwater discoveries in the exhibition which are fascinating; walk over water into the Iron Age on your crannog tour; and test your skills at ancient crafts and technology. In the Spring and Summer, you can also hire one of our dugout canoes, weather permitting. Special events run regularly featuring artists, musicians, skilled craft workers and other specialists who, together with our own team of Iron Age guides, actively bring the past to life for adults and children alike from ages 4+.

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AWARD WINNING In recognition of our dedication to quality, authenticity, and environmental responsibility, the Scottish Crannog Centre’s range of awards includes:

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Her Highlander’s Promise – B. J. Scott

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00O2IROIC?ref_=cm_cr-mr-title

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Having loved the Fraser brothers, I just HAD to have the book when I saw that B.J.Scott had blessed us with another.
Her Highlander’s Promise is such a sweet tale of love conquers all with just enough excitement, violence, passion and action to maintain another fabulous and loved book.
Now I’ll be honest here, I purchased the book simply because of the author, I didn’t think to like it from the description considering the idea too simple and to ‘tame’.
I hold my hands up and admit I was wrong.
The story starts with a ten year old Laurel burying her father and facing the prospect of life with her controlling aunt, uncle and cousin. A handsome 13 year old that she has not met before gives her a ring and promises to return to wed her.
It continues when Laurel is close to her 18th birthday. We find how she has suffered at the hands of a viscious, highly controlling aunt and a completely uninterested uncle who merely allows his wife to do as she pleases.
Gaining a small amount of freedom, laurel is permitted a quick trip to the village to purchase provisions. There she is startled by a handsome man, it seems that Blair has returned for her!
I don’t want to describe to much as I want you to have the pleasure of the tale unfolding as you read but it’s enough to assure you that their love is not easy and obstacles must be faced and defeated to allow the young couple to come together.
With well developed characters and introductions of many secondary characters that you will just love, B.J.Scott again captivates us.
(I love and am intrigued by the uncle! The returning one as opposed to the weak willed one.)
I thoroughly enjoyed this and highly recommend this author!

Turn off the lights, curl up under the duvet and prepare to become addicated to Ian Rob Wright

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00ZO5B4OC?ref_=cm_cr-mr-img

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Fancy something a little scary?
What about a lot scary?
Are you brave enough to pick up a book that may alter your whole life? You are? So what about if instead of one book, I told you there were 5…..
Still brave enough?
Iain Rob Wright is a master in his genre. He’ll have you looking at everything in your life differently. The kid who smiles at you… The luxury cruise…Your safety within your own home…Iain is the reason that dark street suddenly seems so menacing and if you let him, he’ll introduce you to a whole bunch of things that go bump in the night! And bump in the morning, afternoon and evening too…
Think you’re safe? Think again!

Pick up a book and you’re hooked for a while and desperate for more. Pick up a boxset and say goodbye to sleeping as you’re dragged in to the unexplainable and frightening possesion of a once happy ten year old boy. Learn to just give in and buy the cigerettes for the group of youths, because they just will find you. A little bit of snow is good clean fun, but what’s hiding in the behind the bluster when the snow just won’t stop? If the game show with the £2 million prize seems too good to be true, it probably is. And you should never, ever expect to relax on that life-changing cruise…..

 

This is the description of each full length novel included in this boxset.

SAM (Book 1)

First came The Exorcist. Then came The Omen. Now there’s another creepy child to keep you awake at night. You’ll never see the ending coming.

When a washed-up priest and a skittish ghost hunter are summoned to a vast countryside estate, they have no idea what to expect. A grief-stricken mother wants them to help her sick child and investigate a recent string of accidents around her home. It’s clear that something unexplained is going on, but their initial observations point only to a single suspect: 8-year old Sammie. Yet, while it’s clear that little Sammie is a very peculiar child, there’s surely no way he could have been behind the long list of accidents and deaths. He’s just a child…

Sammie has a secret. Want to hear it?

ASBO (Book 2)

A terrifying novel for fans of Eden Lake, the Girl Next Door, and the Purge.

A gentle family man’s life is forever changed when he refuses to buy a pack of cigarettes for the local gang of youths. Led by the emotionally unstable and sadistic Frankie, the gang target the man and his family in an escalating campaign of terror and violence that will threaten their very lives. If only he’d bought those damn cigarettes.

ASBO. Your fear is their entertainment…

THE FINAL WINTER (Book 3)

Iain Rob Wright’s debut novel is a masterclass in suspense and is sure to keep you guessing

What would you do if it started snowing in every country in the world? Would you panic? For a ragtag group of strangers at a run-down English pub, the best solution is a pint of beer with a shot of denial — but one by one they will be left with no choice but to accept that something sinister is lurking outside in the snow. Something that will never let them see light of day.

THE HOUSEMATES (Book 4)

Ten days, twelve competitors, two million in cash.

What at first seems like a wonderful opportunity for Damien Banks turns out to be the worst nightmare he can imagine. Trapped inside a house with eleven strangers and a booming voice known only as ‘The Landlord’, Damien is forced to compete not only for the money, but for his life.

Let the games begin…

SEA SICK (Book 5)

A novel unlike anything else. A story that is equal parts Dawn of the Dead and Groundhog Day. An unforgettable classic.

Police Officer Jack Wardsley’s life ended the moment his partner died. His recent record of brutality, and a reputation for not following the rules, has prompted his seniors to give him an ultimatum: find a way to let go of all the anger – or find another job. That’s why he’s about to board The Spirit of Kirkpatrick, a cruise liner built for relaxation and fun. Pretty soon, however, Jack will realise that a little fun in the sun is the last thing he’s going to get. There’s a virus onboard and it’s driving people insane. Jack needs to put all that anger to good use and find out who’s responsible, before it’s too late.”

 

 

Camera Obscura. Edinburgh.

http://www.camera-obscura.co.uk/

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The Camera Obscura show is a fascinating and highly amusing way to see the city and learn about its history. This unique experience has delighted and intrigued people for over 150 years. It is a ‘must’ on any visit to Edinburgh.

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From inside this mysterious Victorian rooftop chamber, you see live moving images of Edinburgh projected onto a viewing table through a giant periscope.
The guides guide will entertain you while telling stories of Edinburgh, past and present, in an engaging and informative way. Our visitors are truly amazed at how, in this age of high technology, a simple array of mirror, lenses and daylight can produce this incredible panorama.
There is six floors of hands-on, interactive fun!
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HISTORY OF THE ATTRACTION
A brief History of Edinburgh’s oldest purpose built visitor attraction – The Camera Obscura and World of Illusion.

MARIA SHORT
In the early 18th Century the Short family were scientific instrument makers in the south side of Edinburgh. In 1776 their son Thomas leased land on Calton Hill and built a ‘Gothic House’ to house his optical instruments and very fine telescopes, charging admission to see them. He died in 1788.
In 1827, Maria Theresa Short returned to Edinburgh from the West Indies claiming to be Thomas’s daughter. She wished to claim his ‘Great Telescope’ for her inheritance. There was strong competition from other parties, but Maria received the telescope and set up a ‘Popular Observatory’ in 1835, housed in a wooden and stone building next to the National Monument on Calton Hill. She exhibited many scientific instruments and kept her Observatory open till 9pm each evening.
In a leaflet from this period, solar microscopes and achromatic telescopes were regularly included as part of optical exhibitions. One typical show at Short’s observatory in Edinburgh promised to show the eye of a fly ‘magnified into an expanse of 12 feet, each of its many hundred pupils assuming the size of a human eye’
In the early 1850’s, Maria bought a tenement which had once
been the townhouse of the old Laird of Cockpen. She then installed a camera obscura on top of it and exhibitions calling it Short’s Observatory (see image left) and Museum of Science and Art.
PATRICK GEDDES
In 1892, Patrick Geddes, a famous town planner and sociologist, bought the Tower in a public auction. He re-named it the Outlook Tower because he wanted to change people’s outlook. Geddes used the camera obscura to change the way people looked at life and the interaction between town and country.
Although best known as the founder of modern town planning, Geddes’ background was in biology and sociology. Geddes lived in the New Town, like most reasonably affluent people at the time, however he wanted to improve slum conditions in the Old Town, and so he moved to James Court near to the Camera Obscura and improved its appearance, whitewashing the dull walls and introducing plants. He created the first University ‘halls of residence’ at Milne’s Court, setting it up as an idealistic, self managing community with the mission not just to live there, but to influence those around.
Geddes and the Outlook Tower
In 1892, Geddes bought the Tower in a public auction, naming it the ‘Outlook Tower’ because he wanted to change people’s outlook. When taking tours, Geddes would first rush people up the original turnpike stair (currently our escape stair), all the way to the top. After the quick climb, with blood rushing to their heads, visitors were shown the Camera Obscura. Geddes used the Camera to show them ‘life’ as a whole and the relationship between the town and the countryside all around the town.
In the foyer outside the Camera were different coloured stained glass windows with subjects such as ‘botany’, ’zoology’ etc. Geddes wanted to stop people seeing life only through their own interest, or one colour window, but to grasp the wholeness and interdependency of life. The Camera showed the reality – all colours together. After seeing the Camera Obscura, visitors sat in a darkened meditation room – the inlook room – to internalise what they had learned, making it their own. Then visitors went down through the Tower – through the ‘Edinburgh Room’, then down through exhibitions about Scotland, Language, Europe and finally the World.
Later Geddes went to India, the Tower lost its ‘enchanter’, and the place became less of a hive of intellectual debate. However Geddes’ ideas live on and are still popular today, all around the world.
Edinburgh University owned the tower from the 1940’s to 1982 when it was sold to Visitor Centres Ltd. who also runs Landmark Centre, Carrbridge; Inveraray Jail and Landmark Press, a tourism publishing company.
The Camera Obscura has maintained many of its original characteristics; however there have been a few changes throughout the years. When it was originally built, there was only one lens, instead of three. Also, the distance between the lens and the image was much less. The same goes for the original table which was one floor higher up than the present one
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OPEN EVERY DAY! (except 25th December)

SEASONAL OPENING HOURS
July – August: Every day 09:00-21:00
September – October: Every day 09:30-19:00
November – March: Every day 10:00-18:00 (Closed 25th December)
April – June: Every day 09:30-19:00

The last Camera Obscura presentation usually begins 1 hour before closing, or earlier in winter as the Camera Obscura works with daylight. It is recommend that you allow 2 hours for the visit.

STANDARD ADMISSION PRICES
Adult: £13.95, Senior: £11.95, Child (5 – 15 years): £9.95
*under 5’s go free

Enchanted Forest. Pitlochry. Heathergems Jewellery.

http://www.pitlochry.org/whats_on/enchanted-forest.htm

Lo-Call Number: 0871 288 7655
Visit: Just the Ticket, Atholl Road, Pitlochry
International Callers: 0044 1796 947011

Enchanted Forest

My pictures are from the 2014 Enchanted Forest event, Elemental.

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Our 2015 ticket prices are listed below:

Monday – Thursday
Child Under 3: FREE; Child 3 – 15: £7.00; Adult: £16.00; Family Ticket: £45.00

Monday – Thursday Prime Time (7pm – 8pm)
Child Under 3: FREE; Child 3 – 15: £9.00; Adult: £18.00; Family Ticket: £52.00

Friday, Saturday & Sunday
Child Under 3: FREE; Child 3 – 15: £10.00; Adult: £20.00; Family Ticket: £55.00
Prices are subject to change subject to demand and may increase as the event dates draw closer.
Children under 3 MUST have a ticket otherwise there will not be a seat allocated to them on the bus. All bus passengers MUST have tickets.
All tickets will be checked at departures and customers must have a valid physical ticket(s). Electronic tickets i.e emails on smart phones etc will not be accepted.

Pitlochry

map

In the heart of Scotland with real hospitality, clear sparkling air, beautiful scenery, rich clan history, fine food, plenty of space and lots to see and do. Pitlochry is primarily a holiday destination, which caters for the holiday maker year round in its own special way. The people are knowledgeable, friendly and helpful as it has been a tourist destination for well over 150 years, counting Queen Victoria amongst its earlier visitors.
Pitlochry is set in spectacular scenery and is ideally located for touring Highland Perthshire or further afield with Edinburgh 75 minutes to the south, St Andrews 90 minutes to the south east, Loch Ness 95 minutes to the north and Braemar and Royal Deeside 90 minutes to the north east.
Access to the outdoors from Pitlochry is easy – whether on foot on way marked trails, by car on country roads, or by bicycle they are all catered for. The area has plentiful wildlife from red and roe deer to the soaring buzzard or the red squirrel. You are likely to see them all here and may be fortunate enough to see Pine Martins, Golden Eagles or Osprey.

Pitlochry Local Walks

Pitlochry, in the heart of Highland Perthshire, is a walker’s paradise. With its excellent network of well-marked routes, ranging from gentle strolls to challenging hikes, and surrounded by dramatic scenery, there is something for everyone to enjoy. All the Pitlochry walks start and finish in the town centre, avoiding the need to use a car, and they are clearly marked with colour-coded sign posts. Covering an area of approximately 20 square miles, there are nearly 41 miles of tracks and paths taking the visitor along river, burn and loch-side, through woodland and up hills, from where there are spectacular views.

One of the most popular short walks is a circular route from the main street, across the River Tummel to the dam on Loch Faskally, to view the salmon ladder and the Hydro Station, on through the ancient hamlet of Port na Craig, and back over the footbridge into Pitlochry. Another short hike takes the visitor through pretty woodland and up a gentle hill to the Edradour distillery – the smallest distillery in Scotland – and on the return journey, there are beautiful views across open farmland with Ben-y-Vrackie mountain as a backdrop.

Pitlochry and its surrounding area is steeped in history and folklore and, to discover more, stop at the National Trust for Scotland’s Visitor Centre on the Killiecrankie walk. Learn about the Battle of Killiecrankie and the Soldier’s Leap, see the Linn of Tummel waterfall, or spot salmon and admire the abundant bird life from one of the many bridges on this route.

For a more energetic experience, try the Bealach route which takes the walker up onto the moorland above Pitlochry offering, along the way, spectacular views south over the town and north towards Blair Atholl. Further afield, but still within easy reach of Pitlochry, are many other interesting walks including the Falls of Bruar to the north, the Hermitage to the south, and the Birks of Aberfeldy to the west. Whatever your ability, you will find a route to suit.

Ben y Vrackie Pitlochry

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A hill walk crossing an area of typical Scottish moorland scenery, before rising to a summit with suburb panoramic views.

Distance: 6 Miles

Loch Faskally

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A long, low-level circuit of a scenic loch, using woodland paths and a quiet minor road.

Distance: 8 Miles

Loch Dunmore

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Two easy woodland trails round Loch Dunmore, or little further round Dunmore Hills.

Distance: 8 Miles

Faskally via Garry Bridge

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An almost level walk, except for some steps, partly on roads, partly along a nature trail footpath through woods.

Distance: 7 Miles

Logierait

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A quiet road walk to Logierait, with possible extension to Strathtay. Distance about 5 miles outwards, 8 km.

Distance: 5m Miles
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Golf

Nestling on the edge of the town, Pitlochry Golf Club’s 18 hole par 69 course lies over rolling countryside at the foot of Ben-y-Vrackie mountain, with a magnificent panorama stretching over the Tummel valley. The Club is open to members, visitors, beginners and experienced golfers alike, and everyone is welcome to enjoy the first class facilities that the Club has to offer. These include an excellent pro shop, run by PGA Professional Mark Pirie, offering a wide range of advice, tuition, clothes and equipment, a newly refurbished clubhouse with a first-rate restaurant and bar, corporate packages, and special offers throughout the year.

Originally laid out in 1908 by Willie Fernie of Troon, and opened in 1909, Pitlochry Golf Club has recently been nominated by Golf World, the UK’s leading golf magazine, as one of its 66 “Hidden Gems”. The Club is Perthshire’s only nominee on this list, and the award acknowledges that these Hidden Gem courses merit much greater attention than they have enjoyed so far.

The Highland Open, hosted by Pitlochry Golf Club, offers the chance for Ladies, Gents and Junior amateur players of all handicaps to compete on this picturesque course. There are on and off course events during the competitions, plenty of lively social life, and the opportunity to meet and make new friends. Pitlochry Golf Week, which has been a firm favourite for over 30 years, is a packed week of golfing fun in June, for players of all ages and abilities.

Although there is a putting green at the main Club, there is another 18 hole putting course hidden away on the other side of Pitlochry (in Rie-Achan Road). This offers an excellent training ground for players at all levels, with its undulating landscape, and some surprisingly difficult terrain.

Whatever the time of year, there will be something on offer to golfers and non-golfers at Pitlochry Golf Club.

For more information please visit http://www.pitlochrygolf.co.uk
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Pitlochry Fishing

Enjoy salmon, trout and grayling fishing in the ‘Heart of the Highlands’

Fishing includes superb salmon and trout beats on the River Tummel and River Garry as well as bank and boat fishing on Loch Bhac and Loch Kinardochy for rainbow trout and brown trout respectively.

On the Portnacrig/Pitlochry beat below the dam the 5 year average catch is around 150 salmon with April and May normally being the best months. On the Lower Tummel beat the club has fishing from time to time which provides good sport for salmon and summer grilse.

For more interesting and peaceful fishing, the Ruan Ruarie beat on the river Garry is popular after May when the salmon move up into the headwater reaches of the Tilt and Errochty water.

The River Tummel below the Dam is one of the finest brown trout rivers in Scotland while the Upper Tummel above the Falls of Tummel is a smaller river with some nice rocky pools and runs.

Loch Bhac is set in a beautiful location and can be fished from boat or bank for rainbow trout.

Loch Kinardochy is located in the hills above loch Tummel and contains some lovely brown trout up to 2-3lbs.

Contact the club mobile – 07541404048 for any advice and assistance
Pitlochry Angling Club
PO Box 7222
Pitlochry
Perthshire
PH16 9AE
Tel: 07541 404048

Website: http://www.pitlochryanglingclub.com
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Pitlochry Water Sports

Loch Faskally was formed when the Tummel Valley was dammed for the Hydro scheme at Pitlochry. It was the last of the dams in the Hydro schemeand there is a major power station at it’s base. Built into the dam is not only a fish ladder, but also a public viewing gallery, from April to October you will often see salmon as they pass through the ladder. Around 5500 ascend the dam every year.

While fishing on Loch Faskally you can enjoy some of Pitlochry’s most breathtaking scenery and catch a glimpse of some rare wildlife ie osprey, heron, eagles, kingfishers, ducks, otters and deer.
Total adventure in Pitlochry, Highland Perthshire – the best of Scotland, with a difference. A taster day for an office day out, a relaxing break for all the family – or a week long package of outdoor activities for a group of kids. Or a superb, residential fun or business event in Highland Perthshire – the ‘very best of Scotland’

Highland Fling Bungee

We are the UK’s first and only purpose built jump platform. A once-in-a-lifetime free-fall experience of 40 metres towards water from a bridge with one of Scotlands most iconic views. Open all year round

National Trust Killiecrankie Visitor Centre
Killiecrankie
Perthshire, PH16 5LG

Tel: 08453665844
Website http://www.bungeejumpscotland.co.uk

Nae Limits

One of Europe’s leading adventure sports providers providing award-winning outdoor adventure activities from their base in Perthshire. Fantastic White Water Rafting on the River Tay & River Tummel, Canyoning in the Falls of Bruar, Adventure and White Water Tubing, the UK’s first Aqualine, land activities such as Quad Biking and Paintball and adventure activities for under 12’s at Wee Limits. Offering multi activity days and activity breaks with a range of accommodation options. Catering for individuals, adventurers, families, stag & hen groups and schools.

Unit 1 & 2, Ballinluig
Perthshire, PH9 0LG

Tel: 01796 482600
Website http://www.naelimits.co.uk

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Queens View

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A short drive from Pitlochry, along a winding tree-lined road, hugging the River Tummel, lies the Queen’s View. This famous vantage point looks out over one of the most iconic panoramas in Scotland, directly to the west along Loch Tummel from where, on a clear day, you can sometimes see the mountains surrounding Glencoe by the West Coast. A popular destination since Victorian times, it is often thought that the location was named after Queen Victoria who did, in fact, visit in 1866 . However, it is more widely believed to have been named after Queen Isabella the 14th century wife of Robert the Bruce who used the spot as a resting place on her travels

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Just beside the car/coach park at the Queen’s View there is an excellent tea room which serves delicious lunches, teas and cakes from April until the end of October. Across the courtyard is a first class visitor centre, provided by the Forestry Commission, with a video corner showing local wildlife and history, and a shop stocked with a wide range of guide books, covering the flora and fauna of Highland Perthshire, as well as maps and gifts. There are also toilets.

The surrounding area of Strathtummel makes up part of Perthshire’s Big Tree Country and there are plenty of beautiful forest walks nearby. From Allean Forest, just west of Queen’s View, take in the magnificent views over Loch Tummel, and look out for the remains of an 8th century ring fort and a reconstructed 18th century farmstead. Recently two kilometres of paths, and more bridges, have been added, making access to the forest even easier for visitors. Allean Forest is currently closed to the public, following considerable storm damage, so please check http://www.perthshirebigtreecountry.co.uk for further details
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Are you visiting and staying in Pitlochry and want to find out what’s on? The below events are on during the year…

New Years Day Party
Winter Words Festival
Winter Lighting
Etape Caledonia
Pitlochry Festival Theatre
Ladies Highland Open
Mens Highland Open
Highland Games
Pitlochry in Autumn
Enchanted Forest
Heartland FM
Logierait Market

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Food

McKays Bar & Restaurant

We pride ourselves that all the meat used in our menu is Scottish and supplied by local Pitlochry Butcher, McDonald Brothers, who have been supplying Pitlochry for fifty years. All their produce is direct from local Scottish farms.

McKays Bar & Restaurant
140 Atholl Road
Pitlochry. PH16 5AG
Tel: 01796 473888
Website: http://www.mckayshotel.co.uk

Steakhouse at Acarsaid Hotel

The Steakhouse at Acarsaid embraces the region’s plentiful harvest and has created a menu that celebrates the great and the good of Scottish beef, lamb, pork and chicken. Most of our fresh fish and shellfish have been sourced straight from the West Coast. Relax, have a pre-dinner in one of our comfortable lounges whilst choosing from our menu or daily specials.

Open from 5:45 every evening in the main season. Booking is recommended to avoid disappointment.

8 Atholl Road,
Pitlochry, Perthshire, PH16 5BX
Tel: 01796 472389
Website: http://www.acarsaidhotel.com/steakhouse

Knockendarroch – Hotel & Restaurant

Daily changing menu in our AA two rosette restaurant. Pre-theatre dining available. Restaurant booking essential. Contemporary country house style in a quiet, elevated position in central Pitlochry. Stunning panoramic views of Pitlochry and Highland Perthshire from most of our 12 en-suite bedrooms. Comfortable guest lounges with log fires. Free wifi throughout.

Knockendarroch – Hotel & Restaurant
Higher Oakfield
Pitlochry, PH16 5HT
Tel: 01796 473473
Website: http://www.knockendarroch.co.uk

Strathgarry Restaurant & Rooms

At the Strathgarry we have built an excellent reputation for serving a variety of traditional Scottish dishes using fresh and local produce.

Our restaurant opens daily from 9am serving a wide range of breakfast items. Coffee, tea and a range of cakes and freshly baked pastries are served all day until 6pm. Our main menu is available all day with lunch time specials served from 12pm until 6pm and evening specials served till closure.

Opening Times: Open daily from 9am

Strathgarry Restaurant
113 Atholl Road
Pitlochry. PH16 5AG
Tel: 01796 472469
Website: http://www.strathgarryhotel.co.uk

 

Victoria’s Restaurant & Coffee Shop

Family owned, with the emphasis on friendly, attentive service, in informal surroundings. Serving breakfasts, specialty coffees & teas, patisserie, home baking, lunches & light meals 9.30am to 5.30pm. From 5.30pm provides a bistro style dinner menu with freshly made Italian pizzas, fajitas, charcoal grilled steaks, seafood, pasta, burgers, vegetarian dishes & traditionally Scottish fayre.
Victoria’s of Pitlochry
45 Atholl Road
Pitlochry
PH16 5BX
Tel: 01796 472670
Website: http://www.victorias-pitlochry.co.uk

East Haugh House

If you’re looking for delicious food in Pitlochry then this award-winning restaurant is the perfect choice. East Haugh House is a stunning 16th century turreted stone house located just a mile south of Pitlochry in the picturesque Perthshire countryside. Hailed as a hidden gem with ‘the best food in the area’, the menu focuses on locally sourced seafood and game dishes including scallops, venison, and the famous ‘East Haugh’ burger with hand-cut chips! East Haugh House has an extensive a la carte menu as well as daily specials. The menu is served in the Fisherman’s Bar with cosy log fire, or the beautiful Two Sisters Restaurant. Pre-theatre meals available.

East Haugh House Hotel
Pitlochry
PH16 5TE
Tel: 01796 473121
Website: http://www.easthaugh.co.uk

Logierait Inn

Good, Honest Food…and just a short worthwhile drive from Pitlochry. Warm and snug with log fires, a friendly welcome and good honest food, well cooked with locally sourced produce where ever possible. Nothing beats the taste and comfort of real home made food and that is what we at the Logierait Inn strive to offer our valued customers – nothing is too much trouble.

The Logierait Inn, nr Ballinluig,
Pitlochry, Perthshire, PH9 0LJ
Tel: 01796 482423
Website: http://www.logieraitinn.co.uk

The Clubhouse Bar & Restaurant

The Pitlochry Golf Clubhouse is popular with golfers, visiting parties, local families and tourists. The clubhouse has an open licence and is open to all, serving a wide selection of filled rolls, light meals and home baking throughout the day. A great value evening menu and wine list make the restaurant the ideal spot in town to enjoy good company and quality food (from local suppliers).

The Clubhouse Bar & Restaurant
Golf Course Road
Pitlochry
PH16 5QY
Tel: 01796 472334
Website: http://www.pitlochryrestaurant.co.uk

Fern Cottage

A beautiful traditional stone built cottage, in the centre of Pitlochry’s charming main street, Fern Cottage has oodles of charm and character. Our menus combine the finest Scottish ingredients with the best of mediteranean hospitality, offering a unique mix of flavours, tastes and culture. All our food is freshly cooked when make your choice.
Fern Cottage
Ferry Road
Pitlochry
PH16 5DD
Tel: 01796 473840
Website: http://www.ferncottagepitlochry.co.uk

The Chippy at McKays

Ardchoille comes form the Gaelic meaning the ‘High wood’. It started life in 1961 when it opened as a place where you could have a coffee and listen to the juke box. The Chippy at McKays has been continuously owned by the same family since it opened and has served well over one million fish and chips. Indoor and out door patio seating during the summer.

The Chippy at McKays
140 Atholl Road
Pitlochry. PH16 5AG
Tel: 01796 472170

Website: http://www.mckayshotel.co.uk

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Pitlochry is on the main A9 Scottish trunk road system so it is easy to travel by car to Pitlochry. You will find the roads relatively free of traffic compared to the big towns and cities in the south. Our equivalent of a traffic jam is being stuck behind a caravan or tractor.

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Heathergems

 

Heathergems is my favourite shop in Pitlochry. I love it!!
Heathergems Visitor Centre and Factory Shop is in Pitlochry, Perthshire, Scotland. Come and visit us and watch this unique and wonderful process from start to finish in our viewing gallery. Watch as our skilled craftspeople handcraft the Heathergems from natural Scottish heather and see how we make this unique Scottish jewellery and Celtic giftware.

We have a wide range of Heathergems and other Scottish products in our Factory Shop. You will find many shop specials and discounted items only available in our shop. We have an extensive range of Heathergems on sale in many different styles and colours sure to appeal to all ages. We are the ONLY manufacturers of this unique jewellery in the world.

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Location & Opening Times
Heathergems Visitor Centre
& Factory Shop
22 Atholl Road, Pitlochry
Perthshire, PH16 5BX
Scotland, UK

Head Office
+44 (0)1294 313222

Visitor Centre
+44 (0)1796 474391

We are open 7 days a week
Monday to Sunday from 9 am to 5pm

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Heathergems is a unique and imaginative range of Scottish jewellery and giftware, made in Pitlochry, Scotland from natural heather stems. We are the only manufacturers of this unique Scottish product anywhere in the world.

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A division of Charles Buyers & Co Ltd, Heathergems is a family run business based in Pitlochry, Scotland. Heathergems have been produced since the 1950s, shortly after the Second World War. There was a shortage of wood and certain types were rationed and could only be used for limited purposes.

A group of four men set up a workshop near Loch Lomond, where they used small branches of beech wood compressed together to produce flooring tiles. The process was too expensive to produce a floor and only lasted a short time.

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Hugh Kerr a craftsman from Glenlivet developed the process using heather stems and started making Heathergems in very small quantities in his own workshop. In 1969 Hugh met Charles Buyers, a Glasgow Accountant, who was looking for craft industries to be set up in the Highlands as a project for the then Highlands and Islands Development Board. The board decided that it was not viable so Charles decided to put his own money behind Heathergems.

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The original company was set up in a small factory in East Kilbride and began producing Heathergems in the spring of 1970. A few years later it was decided it should be moved to a more natural home in the Highlands. As a result, the company moved to Blair Atholl in Perthshire in 1979. Hugh Kerr died in 1974 and Charles Buyers in 1992. The family decided to move to a new factory in Pitlochry. This has been developed over the years and now includes and shop and visitor centre.

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Heathergems are now stocked in many shops throughout the UK and across the world. We are the only manufacturers of this patented product.
http://www.heathergems.com/index.php

Below are some examples of what you can buy in both the shop and online at their website.
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£14.95
Thistle Brooch

Product Description
Delivery Details

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Traditional Scottish Thistle Brooch in Pewter.

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: 37L x 30W mm

Product code: CHB1
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Macintosh Earrings

Product Description
Delivery Details

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Macintosh Silver Plated Heathergem Drop Earrings.

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: 18L x 18W mm

Product code: HE77

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Heathergem Oval Ring

Product Description
Delivery Details

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Heathergem Silver Plated Ring.

Fully Adjustable

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: Open Backed

Product code: HR4
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Tree Of Life Pendant

Product Description
Delivery Details

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Tree of Life Silver Plated Heathergem Pendant.

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: 26mm x 26mm

Chain: 18″ Plated Chain

Product code: HP100
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Open Heart Pendant

Product Description
Delivery Details

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Open Heart Heather Pendant.

Beautiful handmade all Heathergem pendant.

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: 34L x 32W mm

Chain: 20″ Silver Plated Chain.

Product code: HP40
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Heathergem Thimble

£28.95
Heathergem Thimble

Product Description
Delivery Details

7736288ec4358423cae8586332582bba

Heathergem Thimble

Great Gift Idea.

Supplied in an attractiveorganza bag with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever eactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: L x W mm

Product code: HG11
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Hair Clasp

Product Description
Delivery Details

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Heathergem Hair Clasp.

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: 80L x 22W mm

Product code: SS01H

Hair Clasp

£22.95
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Celtic Picture Frame

£29.95

Celtic Picture Frame

Product Description
Delivery Details

672330864e2356cb307ad8a0fe2f3372

Heathergem Celtic Pewter Picture Frame.

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: 69 L x 57 W mm

Product code: HG10
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Medium Heather Block End

£4.95

Medium Heather Block End

Product Description
Delivery Details

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Medium Heather Block End.

Please note price is for one block end and colours will be selected at random.

The dyed heather stems are compressed into a block. The block end is a section cut from the top of the heather block.

The unique and beautiful heather grain makes this a great and unusual Scottish ornament or gift.

Supplied with a story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: Approx 105mm x 60mm

Product code: HBE2
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£17.95
Scottie Dog Brooch

Product Description
Delivery Details

27176f5d419384fe7d467dc2047248ea

Scottie Dog Heathergem Brooch.

Made from Scottish Heather.

Supplied in a gift box with story card on how we make Heathergems. Heathergems are unique and no two are ever exactly the same.

Handcrafted in Scotland.

Dimensions: 35mm x 25mm

Product code: HB16
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Where possible we aim to match the colour in the picture but unless a specific colour is requested in the special instruction box at checkout colours may vary
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The Wheelhouse. Linlithgow. Holiday Cottage

http://www.hoseasons.co.uk/cottages/the-wheelhouse-s4481
Brochure page number: 15

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No animals, no children. But it makes sense as the cottage is right on the river.

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Nestled at the end of a secluded, private track and overlooking the beautiful River Avon, this lovingly restored former watermill provides the ultimate romantic hideaway and features river views from the verandahs. The sights and sounds of the river as it gently flows over the rapids can be enjoyed from the luxury of an outdoor hot tub or the two verandahs, one of which can be accessed from one of the double bedrooms – visitors can even try a little trout fishing. Historic Linlithgow’s many amenities are 4 miles; Edinburgh is a 25 mile drive, or by train (every 15 minutes) from Linlithgow.

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We arrived early and lost due to difficulties getting through Linlithgow as it was Gala day. We phoned the owners who gave us very clear directions and were happy to let us in early. They waited for us on the wall outside their cottage and the male owner (I’m awful at remembering names) took us down to the cottage and showed us round and gave loads of information about the area, about how they had tranformed the ruined mill into a glorious place to stay!
Now I have to say it, it’s noisy. I mean REALLY loud. The water rushes past fast and produces a massive amount of noise!

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Ground floor: Living room/kitchen. Dining room. Utility room. Bathroom with bath, shower cubicle and toilet. First floor: 2 double bedrooms. Shower room with toilet.

Facilities
Oil CH, elec, bed linen and towels inc. Freesat TV. DVD. M/wave. W/machine. T/dryer. Payphone. Garden and furniture. Two verandahs. Parking. Hot tub. Fishing foc. No smoking. No children under 18 years. NB: Unfenced river in garden.

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The hot tub was amazing and we went in every night!

Highland Folk Museum

https://www.highlifehighland.com/highlandfolkmuseum/

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Highland Folk Museum give visitors a flavour of how Highland people lived and worked from the 1700s up until the 1960s! They manage this by displaying over 30 historical buildings and furnishing them appropriate to their time period.  Some have been built from scratch on site and some have been moved here from other locations.

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The site is a mile long with the 1700s Township (featuring 6 houses) at one end through to the 1930s working croft at the other.There’s an on site cafe, gift shop and a children’s playground.
The Museum is located at Newtonmore in the Scottish Highlands amidst some of the most beautiful scenery in the world.

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Also home to ‘Am Fasgadh’ storing 10,000 artefacts plus high quality meeting rooms, a research library, conservation laboratory and suite of offices.
Visitor Information
Open April – August 10.30 – 17.30     September – October 11.00 – 16.30
No entry charge.   Open 7 days.

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The Highland Folk Museum has a wide range of facilities to ensure a comfortable and
enjoyable visit for your visit.
Assistance dogs are welcome. For all other dogs there is a fenced dog creche at reception, which has shelter and water provided to enable you to leave your dog when visiting the Museum. Please speak to a member of our team for advice on dog walks nearby.
Toilet and baby changing facilities can be found at our main reception area and are also available at Croft and Township.
Free parking is available at the Museum for all visitors. We have a large car park with bays for coaches and marked spaces for less able visitors beside the reception entrance.
Don’t miss purchasing your copy of our guidebook, with colour photos and lots of information on all our buildings across the site, it is the perfect companion to your visit. Guidebooks and basic maps are also available to purchase from our reception, shop and sweetie shop.
I can’t reccomend it enough and the fact that it’s free entrance means it’s a must have stop for everyone.

 

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Café
The café has a range of hot and cold foods and drinks. From freshly made soup and sandwiches, to delicious cakes and sweet treats. Along with kids meals, vegetarian and gluten free options our café has something for everyone.
The café has seating for 40, disabled access via a ramp and a large outdoor picnic area with a kids play area alongside.
Kirk’s Store Sweetie Shop
There is a traditional sweet shop – named after the Kirk family who farmed Aultlarie Croft prior to the museum moving onto this site – is a popular attraction for our visitors all year round.
This recreation of a 1930’s sweet shop offers visitors the chance to indulge their sweet tooth and nostalgia by buying a wee poke of traditional sweets such as ‘Soor Plums’, ‘Liquorice Comfits’, ‘Lucky Tatties’ and many more.
Gift shop
The gift shop is located by the museum entrance and offers a range of themed gifts, souvenirs, local crafts, outdoor toys and lots more. Along with cold drinks, ice creams for the sunshine or woolly hats and ponchos for those rainy days the gift shop is an essential stop off for your visit to the museum.

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You can even get married there!
The Highland Folk Museum is a stunning and unique setting for a wedding.
The museum is licenced to hold weddings and civil partnerships anywhere on the site so you are able to hold your ceremony in any of our historic buildings such as Leanach Church, outdoors or in a marquee if you desire.
After your ceremony the museum is a fantastic place for your post ceremony celebrations. The large, outdoor spaces can play host to marquees of any size to accommodate your plans for a drinks reception, wedding meal and dance.

 

 

 

Edinburgh Zoo

 

http://www.edinburghzoo.org.uk/

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Please note: Edinburgh Zoo is located on Corstorphine Hill, and some of the paths around the park involve steep slopes. We would advise visitors to plan their route and bring suitable footwear – the views from the top are worth it! The workout on your calf muscles has got to be equivalent to hours in the gym!

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It’s hard work but there are a lot of benches to take breaks.
Trying to find the tigers?  Lost near the lemurs? With over 80 acres of hillside parkland it can be hard to find your way around but the staff are very helpful, there are loads of maps and you can download one off the website so you can plan your trip before you go. Also the guidebook is informative and has loads of information on the various animals and getting around.
Wet weather and Indoor Activities
11 indoor animal housing areas and 6 sheltered observation areas ensure that even on a rainy day, a trip to the Zoo is an enthralling experience.

We didn’t get to see many of the big cats as they were cleaning enclosures at that time. And it took ages!

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However we hung around near the lions and were able to watch feeding time.

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Ticket Prices
Price as of 3/4/15 – 1/11/15
Adult
£18.00
Child 3 – 15 years
£13.50
Child (under 3)
FREE

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Wheelchair and Mobility Access
Many of the paths around the Zoo can be accessed by wheelchair.  However some routes involve steps or steep slopes which are unsuitable for wheelchairs.
We are also pleased to be able to offer a dedicated mobility vehicle to help visitors access areas of the park that may otherwise be difficult to reach.

I’m not sure if they are still doing it or how long it will last but they were doing specific studies on the lifes of various monkey species when we were there.
The information was really interesting and we were able to get really close.

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Jim Clark Room, Duns. 44 Newtown Street.

Jim Clark Room, Duns. 44 Newtown Street.
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Museum dedicated to the life of Jim Clark, twice world motor racing champion in the 1960’s. Contains a unique collection of memorabilia, trophies and photographs.

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Opening Hours
23rd March – 30th September
Monday to Saturday: 10am to 1pm & 2pm to 4:30pm
Sunday: 2pm to 4pm
1st – 31st October
Monday to Saturday: 1pm to 4pm

(Opening times should always be confirmed prior to travelling.)

 

Admission:
Free.

Contact:
Tel: 01361 883960
It’s not big and it’s not flashy but any fan of F1 would love it. There is loads of things to look at.
You can’t take pictures inside and the gift shop area is expensive.

John Knox House. Edinburgh

John Knox House: Edinburgh

Hunt for the devil hiding in The Oak Room ceiling and try your hand at our portrait puzzles that have stumped many visitors in the past. Try on costumes and just ‘feel’ the atmosphere.

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John Knox House dates back to 1470, which makes it and Moubray House which is attached, the only original medieval building surviving on the Royal Mile. The house is associated with one of the most dramatic and turbulent times in Scottish History – The Scottish Reformation – which resulted in the outbreak of civil war and the abdication of Mary, Queen of Scots.
Although John Knox only stayed in this house for a short time before his death in 1572, it was his association with the house that saved it from demolition in the 1840s. During an excavation of the house, time-capsules were found buried in the gable wall of the house to commemorate the moment the building was saved. One of these time capsules is displayed in the window of our bookshop.
James Mosman – jeweller and goldsmith to Mary, Queen of Scots – lived in the house in the 1550s until his execution in 1573. He was extremely loyal to Queen Mary and was part of the ‘Queen’s Men’ who seized Edinburgh Castle in an attempt to restore Mary to the throne after her forced abdication in favour of her protestant son James VI.
You can get a guided tour and an audio tour but I’d phone in advance if that was your intention.