Indigo Gabbro

Indigo Gabbro

 

Indigo Gabbro – High Energy, Expand Consciousness, Protection
Indigo Gabbro is used to raise natural intuition. It is used to amplify and clarify clairvoyance, clairaudience, and clairsentience.
As a high energy stone Indigo Gabbro is used to increase the ability to channel Reiki and other types of energy healing. It is also used to channel energy for other uses.
Indigo Gabbro is a strongly protective stone. It is used to clear the aura and to shield the aura and psyche. It is also used very frequently for EMF / EMR protection. It is said to transmute negative energy, a powerful way to protect from negative energies of all kinds.

Faith, Religion, Christianity And Jesus

I am not a religious person.

That does not mean I am ignorant nor do I have no knowledge of various religions and beliefs. And no it doesn’t mean I have no beliefs of my own only that what I do have fits into no other religions or has parts of many others.

But religion plays an important part in the world and probably none as much as Christianity. It is at this time of the year, with Christmas upon us that religion is often times forgotten in the midst of Snata and presents and turkey……

So, I must point out that I’m not trying to be offensive in any way. If I do offend then I’m sorry. However I have always prided myself on the fact that I am willing to listen to all viewpoints and all I ask is the same courtesy back.

 

Now I went to church every Sunday. I went to Girls Brigade, bible study and even spent weeks of the summer vacation in a church led club. I feel I have earned the right to an opinion here.

I always had two major problems with religion. There are many problems that I’ve had but two MAJOR ones.

The first was and always will be that no religion approves of murder, in fact they all consider it a sin of some kind. A sensless waste of human life that God/Gods have created.

My second was always the portrayel of Jesus Christ. Where did this pretty, delicately featured image of a pale skinned, slightly effeminate brown haired man come from? We know from where and when he was born that he would certainly be darker skinned and he would be ‘work roughened’. There would have been no easy gentle upbringing, he would have worked hard and have the callouses etc to show for it.

jesus1jesusmaryjoseph

So the fact that a new image has come to life, a more realistic image is great.

Forensic anthropologist and medical artist Richard Neave used computer tomography, analyzing three skulls from archaeological sites in Jerusalem. To determine the color of his skin and hair, scientists studied drawings from the same time period. The result was a man with dark skin and eyes, short curly hair, a broad nose and a beard. These features, scientists say, are what a first century Jewish man would have looked like. Scientists are calling this the most accurate image of Jesus they’ve ever seen.

jesus

I agree.

 

And if I’m going to hell anyway for my blasphemous thoughts then let me put another thought out there… why is it so hard to believe in the possibility of Jesus having married Mary Magdalene? Ge a grip people, he was a man. In a time when marriage and children were important The idea that he was some virginal man is ridiculous.

jesus-magdalene

So now I’ve riled up Christians i’ll wish you a merry christmas and be done with it!!!

 

 

By the way I have no doubts in the presence of Jesus. I just don’t believe he is the son of a God but I see no reason why he couldn’t of been a talented healer and speaker. Let’s remember that for a long time sneezes were considered a way of dispelling demons from the body… Modern medicine was at one point considered miraculous!

 

Christmas Tree

Search for the roots of today’s Christmas traditions and you will find your way back to the ancient Celtic festival of Alban Arthuan, held during the Winter Solstice on December 21. One of the principle reasons for the rapid propagation of Christianity throughout Europe during the first millennium was the willingness of Christian leaders to incorporate the rituals, beliefs and customs of other religions. Few of the ancient displaced religions were more assimilated than the Druids, Wiccans and Pagans.

The custom of burning the Yule Log, the Yule-associated tradition that is most familiar to people today, was performed to honor the Great Mother Goddess. The log would be lit on the eve of the solstice, using the remains of the log from the previous year, and would be burned for twelve hours for good luck.

Decorating the Yule tree was also originally a Pagan custom; brightly colored decorations would be hung on the tree, usually a pine, to symbolize the various stellar objects which were of significance to the Pagans – the sun, moon, and stars – and also to represent the souls of those who had died in the previous year. The modern practice of gift giving evolved from the Pagan tradition of hanging gifts on the Yule tree as offerings to the various Pagan Gods and Goddesses.

The Christmas tree is said to have originated in Germany with the decoration of pine trees with fancy ornaments.

However, there are alternate theories that suggest otherwise. In fact, there are many legends about the Christmas tree that led to the widespread belief that the Christmas tree is an essential part of the Christmas season and its celebration. There is the legend of St. Boniface, an English monk, who is said to have saved a child from being sacrificed by pagans. When they were gathered around an oak tree to sacrifice the child, the Saint flattened the tree with one blow of his fist. A small fir sprang up in its place and St. Boniface told the pagans that it was the “tree of life,” and represented the life of Christ.

005_Weihnachtsaltar_und_Krippe_in_der_Sanoker_Franziskanerkirche,_2013

The Nordic pagans and the Celtic Druids revered the evergreen tree as a symbol of everlasting life and hope for the return of spring. While other plants and trees died, the evergreen trees remained alive continually; hence, they were revered as manifestations of deity. As a symbol of prosperity, the Druids decorated the evergreen outdoors. It was the Scandinavian pagans who were the pioneers in bringing the decorated trees indoors; and the Saxons, a Germanic pagan tribe, who were the first to use candles to illuminate the tree. In addition to these pagan rituals, the tree is also linked to the celebration of the Winter Solstice. Pagans would celebrate the Winter Solstice, and as a part of that celebration, they would decorate trees. This celebration represented the end of the long, dark winter days and the beginning of the spring and its connection to life. The triumph over the winter darkness was the reason for the celebration. There are many other theories about the origin of the Christmas tree. Researchers have failed to accurately pinpoint a single origin, but it is correct to state that it evolved from pagan traditions. Understanding how the tree was used in the past will shed light on its meaning in the Christmas celebration. Many Christians unwittingly partake in tree decorating without knowing the cryptic meanings behind the adoration/decorating of a tree. The fact that the evergreen tree was considered in pagan religions to symbolize everlasting life, robs us of the reality of Jesus’ supreme sacrifice that enables us to have true eternal life. The evergreen tree is believed by some pagans to hold continual life, and as such, is commonly used in pagan worship and celebrations.

A Christmas tree is a decorated tree, usually an evergreen conifer such as spruce, fir or an artificial tree of similiar appearance.

varieties-of-christmas-trees

 

The tree was traditionally decorated with edibles such as apples, nuts, or other foods. In the 18th century, it began to be illuminated by candles which were ultimately replaced by Christmas lights after the invention of electrification. Today there is a wide variety of traditional ornaments, garlands, tinsel and candy canes. An angel or star is often placed at the top of the tree normally represents the archangel Gabriel or the star of Bethlehem (from the Nativity).

800px-Candle_on_Christmas_tree_3

The Christmas tree has also been known as the “Yule-tree”, especially in discussions of it’s folklore.

Although the tradition of decorating the home with evergreens was long established, the custom of decorating an entire small tree was unknown in Britain until some two centuries ago. At the time of the personal union with Hanover, George III’s German wife, Charlotte, introduced a Christmas tree at a party she gave for children in 1800. The custom didn’t spread much beyond the royal family to begin with.
Queen Victoria was familiar with them and even as a child had one in her bedroom. after she married Prince Albert (her German cousin) the custom became more widespread as wealthier families began to follow the tradition.

JOHANS~1

Woonkamer_vol_keurig_geklede_kinderen_die_bij_de_kerstboom_dansen1870_ChristmasTree_byEhninger_HarpersBazaarGezin_bij_de_kerstboom

 

 

Their use at public entertainments, charity bazaars and in hospitals made them increasingly familiar however, and in 1906 a charity was set up specifically to ensure even poor children in London slums ‘who had never seen a Christmas tree’ would enjoy one that year. In 1933 a restriction on the importation of foreign trees led to Britain growing their own Christmas trees.

 fcf9aeb4c38040046ecb01177adbf07d

By 2013 the number of trees grown in Britain for the Christmas market was approximately 8 million.

I mean, that’s a lot!!

In some cities, a  festival of trees is organised around the decoration and display of multiple trees as charity events. 

events6406

 

Pilgrims Progress – Steven Payne – Mid 14th century pilgrimage

What this guy is doing is amazing.
https://www.facebook.com/#!/14thcenturypilgrimsprogress/
Everything is traditional mid 14th century. ALL his clothing, provisions and food.
All of Steven Payne’s clothes are made in the same way they would have been in 1365.
This is going to be a hard journey but an amazing experience for him.

All of Steven Payne's clothes are made in the same way they would have been in 1365

His aim is to be the first in 500 years to walk the Pilgrims way from Southampton, to the shrine of Becket at Canterbury. He has a letter from the Pope in case anyone objects to him sleeping in their churchyard or porch way.

He has done everything from scratch, crafting what he can himself and sourcing what he can’t make and having it done as close to authentic as possible.
We know he is taking a jar of honey, a box of block salt, an apple shaped box (which he made himself) full of apple and cinnamon leaf ‘tea’. A walnut box of aromatic herbs for bathing, some bags of coin to donate to people in need, a needle case and a case for thread in case the kit needs repair and a round walnut box of beeswax. He even made his own bowls! A larger one made of chestnut which should serve for main meals and a smaller one is just right for using as a maser (drinking bowl).

He received a lot of information on medieval food ‘on the go’ and is planning on taking items such as a heavy fruit loaf almonds, cheese, dried fruit, bread, boiled eggs, salt, cinnamon, dried apple slices, oat cakes and a pork and venison pie. He is also taking some Rochester dark ginger wine which is non-alcoholic.
He is taking a wash kit that will help with hygiene, he really did his research and found so much good and interesting articles and information. His wash kit includes home made olive oil soap, salt for the teeth, a block of deodorising alum, cloves, a boxwood comb and some liquorice root sticks, all on a woollen ‘towel’.
He also made his own  Staff.
The staff is of a particular design, shown in numerous carvings and paintings…….roughly 5′ 6″ to 6′ 6″ tall it had a double ball carved into the shaft. This meant that when carried over the shoulder, a bag of possessions could be tied to the end where the balls would prevent it from slipping off, but equally importantly the double ball acted like a pommel and cross guard, allowing the staff to be used much like a double-handed waster (practice sword) if the Pilgrim should come under attack by robbers or wolves along the way.

On his travels he will be taking a copy of a 14th century Paternoster that he made for a friend in the USA, he will have it blessed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, as the practice of carrying an object on behalf of someone who could not make the journey themselves was common in the middle ages, and was endorsed by the Church.